rout


rout
root, rout
The OED records two verbs spelt root (and pronounced like boot), and no fewer than ten verbs spelt rout (and pronounced like bout). An overlap occurs in the meaning ‘to poke about’, which can be either root about or rout about, each pronounced in its own way. Choice depends largely on regional identity. Of the many other meanings of these words, root for (= encourage by applause) is mainly confined to American slang but is occasionally heard in Britain.
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rout, route verbs.
The -ing forms of these two verbs are respectively routing and routeing.

Modern English usage. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Rout — Rout, n. [OF. route, LL. rupta, properly, a breaking, fr. L. ruptus, p. p. of rumpere to break. See {Rupture}, {reave}, and cf. {Rote} repetition of forms, {Route}. In some senses this word has been confused with rout a bellowing, an uproar.]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • rout — rout1 [rout] n. [ME route < OFr, troop, band, lit., part broken off < L rupta: see ROUTE] 1. a disorderly crowd; noisy mob; rabble 2. a disorderly flight or retreat, as of defeated troops [to be put to rout] 3. an overwhelming defeat 4.… …   English World dictionary

  • rout — rout·ous; rout·ous·ly; de·rout; rout; rout·er; …   English syllables

  • Rout — Rout, n. A bellowing; a shouting; noise; clamor; uproar; disturbance; tumult. Shak. [1913 Webster] This new book the whole world makes such a rout about. Sterne. [1913 Webster] My child, it is not well, I said, Among the graves to shout; To laugh …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Rout — Rout, v. t. [A variant of root.] To scoop out with a gouge or other tool; to furrow. [1913 Webster] {To rout out} (a) To turn up to view, as if by rooting; to discover; to find. (b) To turn out by force or compulsion; as, to rout people out of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Rout — (rout), v. i. [AS. hr[=u]tan.] To roar; to bellow; to snort; to snore loudly. [Obs. or Scot.] Chaucer. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Rout — Rout, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Routed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Routing}.] To break the ranks of, as troops, and put them to flight in disorder; to put to rout. [1913 Webster] That party . . . that charged the Scots, so totally routed and defeated their… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • rout — (rout , et, plus souvent, raout ) s. m. Assemblée nombreuse de personnes du grand monde. •   Je pris à l Arsenal un jour pour recevoir du monde ; mais heureusement les routs n étaient pas encore introduits en France, GENLIS Mém. t. V, p. 188,… …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • rout — Ⅰ. rout [1] ► NOUN 1) a disorderly retreat of defeated troops. 2) a decisive defeat. 3) archaic a disorderly or tumultuous crowd of people. ► VERB ▪ defeat utterly and force to retreat. ORIGIN obsolete French …   English terms dictionary

  • rout|er — rout|er1 «ROW tuhr», noun, verb. –n. 1. any one of various tools or machines for hollowing out or furrowing. 2. a person who routs. –v.t. to hollow out with a router. ╂[< rout2 + er1] rout|er2 «ROO uhr, ROW », noun. 1. a person who arranges a …   Useful english dictionary

  • Rout — Rout, v. i. To search or root in the ground, as a swine. Edwards. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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